Smart dog crate

by on 16.04.2018

Which Sport Should You Do With Your Dog? Left to their own devices, young puppies can get in a lot of trouble, from soiling smart dog crate carpet to chewing your favorite pair of shoes. That’s why it’s important to start training early and keep a close eye on them, especially when they’re still learning what’s expected of them.

And the best way to do that is to crate train. First of all, understand that crate training is not cruel. In spite of what some people may have told you, breeders and veterinarians recommend using a crate for your dog from a young age. Giving your puppy his own personal bedroom can help him feel more secure.

This method is also extremely effective for house training while you’re not keeping a hawk eye on them—dogs won’t want to soil their bed, but will have little issue with sneaking into another room of the house to go if they’re not yet fully trained. Finally, crate training can help prevent anxiety. For puppies, overseeing a big house when no one is with them can be overwhelming. Read more on useful ways to use dog crates here.

Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers. Why size matters: A crate that’s too small will be uncomfortable for your dog, but a crate that’s too large may give your dog the space he needs to have an accident without it ruining his bedding. This behavior might encourage future accidents in the crate and around the home.

The most important part of crate training is making sure your puppy always associates it with a positive experience. Start by lining it with blankets and place a few toys inside to make it cozy. Make sure it is still ventilated and not too hot if you do this. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.